Physically Aged, Virtually Young

October 27, 2012

In 2050 25.3% of Australia’s population will be over 65 years of age, with many of us living routinely to 100 and preferring to remain in our own homes, as long as possible.

How will the Australian government and the Aged Care industry cope with this?

Given that we will have fewer people in our workforce and more demands on those that are; an employment landscape that is less 9 -5 and more project and task driven, where will Aged Care workers come from?

This is the start of my chat this afternoon with 2UE’s Clinton Maynard and Trevor Long as we looked at technology in institutional, residential and at-home aged care.

This included magic carpets that monitor a persons walking and movements, homes that monitor residents for vital signs, robots that wash hair and sit with dementia patients to ensure their safety and much more.

Have a listen now:


We’re all getting older

August 1, 2012

Today’s kids will live to 120 years of age and many of today’s Baby Boomers will live well into their 90’s, with well being the key word.

The role and purpose of aged care is changing dramatically, moving away from a traditional institutional model to a bright new shiny “hotel” approach, as well as a huge industry growing around the cutting edge of providing at home services assisting people to remain at home as long as possible.

In this week’s segment on ABC’s Radio Australia I chat with Clem and Adelaine about in-home technology assistance that constantly monitors your in-home activities to ensure you are well and maintaining your daily routine.

It tracks and assesses your movements, eating habits, taking of medicines and your completion of daily chores and where it sees deviation away from these, or you have fallen or in need of assistance, it triggers a range of pre determined responses including calling for help and getting you and the home ready to accept assistance.

Residential Aged Care is also set for an evolution with great nurses and doctors assisted by robots, constant medical monitoring devices, head up display goggles that gives them access to all their patients medical records; and dementia specific assistance robots.

On the edge of this we finished our segment by taking a quick look at bio-technologies that allow us to print human arteries, hips and bodies part.

All in all we are set to live longer, remain healthier and have far more options for what aging and aged care means and how we approach it and manage it.

Listen to the segment now: