Technology is taking over our lives

February 22, 2013

tv is evilI got a call this morning from Steve Mills host of Perth’s 6PR breakfast show about a recent study that concluded that people fear that in 80 years we will have lost all human interaction and instead will be tethered hypnotically and blindly to a computer, or whatever technology becomes or is called by then.

OK, my first reaction, is step slowly away from the ledge and hide all the sharp instruments.

Do we really have so little faith in the human race that we buy all this sci fi doom and gloom scare mongering?

We have survived for millenniums and have never melded with machines before and it’s fairly safe that we won’t in the next 80 years.

The line between human and machine blurred many years ago, with every medical and scientific advancement we ever made including hearing aids, pacemakers, bionic ears and human implants, but we survive and are clearly still human.

People let’s give us some credit!

We are social, gregarious community oriented animals, who rely on each other to survive and thrive and even in our countless attempts to change and reshape human lives and society we keep reverting back to type.

Social media is a prime example of how we have been told that society as we know it has ended and with the advent of Facebook, Twitter, SMS, mobile phones, Skype and so many other on line rabble rouses we no longer have the need to physically meet one another.

This has never been more untrue, we statistically connect with each other more than we ever have before. Is it the same communication? NO. Is it better or worse? That’s the debate.

Let’s temper this debate though with the memory that nearly every form of technology that we have ever invented or innovated including Gutenberg press, radio and TV were all seen as the devils child in their formative years.

The good old days were rarely that good.

Time tends to diminish the emotion and angst we felt and instead leaves us with two dimensional memories safely preserved and packaged for all time as truths.

The future has not been written, these prophetic insights are not mandated.

The future can only be created in our hearts, souls and minds, so instead of invoking the worst outcomes let’s plan instead for a far more harmonious future, one in which we use our advancements to eradicate social injustices, we learn to tame and cure diseases and continue to remain vigilant about the the boundary’s between man and machine.

Now I’ll get off my soap box, let you have a listen to my far shorter on-air response and look out for your thoughts on how you see the next 80 years and beyond.

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Tourism needs to be more Social

July 17, 2012

If you’re going to ask me what the tourism industry needs to do to keep improving, then part of the answer has to be to get more social.

At this week’s Tasmanian Tourism conference I outlined that one of the most important things tourism operators can do to remain relevant into the future is to tear down their physical walls and thinking and embrace the virtual world.

If we remain too fixated on our physical product, offering, venue or experience then we are missing a large chunk of an increasing number of tourists needs and that is a combined physical and digital experience.

Take a look at ABC TV interview above to hear more.


Heaven just got a hell of a great innovator

October 6, 2011

Steve Jobs legacy will be the cause of much writing and review but his place in history is, I’m sure, certain for bringing innovation and fresh thinking to the brave new computer and digital worlds.

Today as a tribute to the man I am choosing to reflect on his determination to see the future for what it had to be and not merely as a poor reflection of what has been.

In 2005 he told a group of Stanford graduates “remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life. Because almost everything – all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure – these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important”.

His gift to us all is that we figure out, in life, what is truly important to us, steel our determination, gather our courage and go for it.

Adelaine Ng of Radio Australia and I chatted about Steve’s legacy, Apple’s road ahead and where to now for innovation, in our on air tribute to Steve Job.

Listen now: